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Deaton Family Visit: Cairns and Uluru

Carol and Dave and an Indigenous Australian

The second of our family visits began at the end of August with the arrival of the Deaton family. Also in town for two weeks to coincide with Kristen’s break between terms, the Deatons had a full itinerary and wasted no time getting started.

Carol and Kristen snorkeling the Great Barrier Reef

After the usual Sydney orientation walks that all of our guests must endure, Kristen and her parents departed for Cairns and the Great Barrier Reef. After dropping off their stuff at the Sheraton Mirage Port Douglas, they boarded a Quicksilver tour at the Marina Mirage and headed out to the Agincourt Reef and Quicksilver’s floating platform. Complete with showers, a bar, and even a post office box, the Agincourt Reef platform offered everything a snorkeler or diver could want. There were even semi-submersibles docked at the platform for those wanting to see the reef without getting in the water.

A star of Hartley's Crocodile Adventures

Regaining their land legs, the Deatons then stopped by the Kuranda Scenic Railway and Skyrail before taking a trip with Hartley’s Crocodile Adventures. On the forefront of the “immersion exhibit” movement, Hartley’s features a massive lagoon containing 19 crocodiles. Boat tours run 5 times per day to show visitors the crocodiles in their natural habitat. That is, laying around on the banks of the lagoon most of the time. But the tours also include “pole feedings”, where a dead chicken is attached to the edge of the pole and dangled above the water. As you can see on the right, this seems to get the crocodiles’ attention.

Ryan, Kristen, Carol, and Dave near Uluru

After visiting with the crocs, Kristen and her parents flew to Ayers Rock Airport, where I met them for a quick visit to Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park. Uluru / Ayers Rock is a giant rock formation in the southwest corner of Australia’s Northern Territory. A sacred Aboriginal site, the rock and the surrounding area have become a sizable tourist attraction, supporting several hotels and loads of tourist activities centered around this otherwise barren patch of outback.

Carol, Dave, Kristen, and Ryan on the Uluru Sunrise Camel Tour

Since there isn’t really much else to do other than look at the rock while engaging in the aforementioned tourist activities, our trip consisted of two tours and one night in the Emu Walk Apartments. The first tour was the Sounds of Silence, which included an Australian BBQ and a narrated tour of the night sky by a “startalker” — a native storyteller + astronomer. Not that she had to say much… at over 200 miles southwest of the nearest large town (Alice Springs), a clear sky over Uluru doesn’t really need any narration.

The following morning, everyone woke up early for the next excursion, the Uluru Sunrise Camel Tour. No, camels aren’t native to Australia, but after their introduction the animals thrived in the environment; Australia contains the last wild dromedary population in the world. Arriving early in the morning, we saddled up and rode our camels into the desert, just in time to watch the sunrise over the outback. Not that we needed to see it from the back of a camel, but that made it all the more fun. We dropped off our camels at the camp before stopping by the hotel on the way to catch our flight to Sydney.

While I wouldn’t put it at the top of your list, if you have the time during your visit to Australia, Uluru is worth at least a day or two. It’s easy to spend months in Australia without ever seeing the terrain that makes up the vast majority of the continent, but it’s worth seeing just how barren the outback can be. Sure, Uluru is just a rock, and perhaps not as remarkable as the Opera House or the Great Barrier Reef, but it’s worth a visit if for no other reason than to see what the rest of Australia looks like.

Check out 10 more pictures on Flickr