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Deaton Family Visit: Sydney and the Blue Mountains

Carol, Dave, and Kristen climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge

Returning to Sydney, the Deatons set off to further explore the city and the surrounding attractions, starting with a view of Sydney from atop the Harbour Bridge. Sydney’s BridgeClimb remains one of our top recommendations for visitors to Sydney; it’s an entertaining and unique way to see the city and learn about the engineering achievement that is the world’s tallest steel arch bridge.  Having now climbed the bridge twice, Kristen earned her “BridgeClimb Master” certificate of achievement.

Carol and Dave on a Sydney jet boat

The next stop on the Sydney itinerary was a fast-paced jetboat tour of the harbour. Originally designed for the shallow rivers of New Zealand, jetboats have increased in popularity due to their maneuverability and operational versatility. After booking a tour with Harbour Jet, the Deatons set off on their journey past many of Sydney’s waterfront landmarks, including the bridge, Luna Park, Cockatoo Island, and, of course, the Opera House. Along the way, the driver did his best to spin and soak his passengers.

Cockatoos and the Three Sisters

The next day, Kristen and her parents set off to the west to see a couple more Sydney landmarks, starting with the Olympic Park. No longer covered with rides and farm animals, the Olympic Park is quiet on normal days, which makes it easier to explore and take in a bit of sporting history. After leaving the park, the Deatons continued west towards one of Sydney’s most famous natural attractions, the Blue Mountains. Named for the lingering blue haze caused by evaporated eucalyptus oil, the mountains host a variety of wildlife and several rock formations, including the Three Sisters.

Dave and Carol in the Blue Mountains

In addition to scenery and wildlife, the Blue Mountains are also rich in natural resources, the extraction of which constitutes much of the area’s recent history. Coal and shale mining began around 1865 and continued into the mid 20th century, until it was no longer economically viable. Though there are many replica artifacts to illustrate the story of mining in the area, original machinery and hauling equipment, long since abandoned and rusted over, can be seen as part of the scenic walks in the valley.

After a quick stop at the Featherdale Wildlife Park  on the way home, the Deatons continued their touring, getting to know more about our daily life and experiences in Sydney. In particular, Kristen took her parents on a tour of the Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) on the UNSW campus, where she spends most of her days. About 20 minutes south-east of the CBD, UNSW is conveniently located close to Coogee Beach for those days when class lets out early.

The Deatons’ two weeks wrapped up with a Sydney Harbour dinner cruise and a few more pictures in front of the Opera House before boarding a flight back to the USA. It was great to show Kristen’s parents around, as exploring Sydney was (and remains) high on our todo list. While we do spend a fair amount of time traveling, it was nice to become more familiar with the city we currently call home.

Dave and Kristen at UNSW

Vivid Sydney and our First Official Visitors

Customs House lit up for Vivid Sydney

Regular readers (who manage to keep up with my erratic posting schedule) know by now that Sydney is a city of many festivals. If you look hard enough, there’s something going on somewhere in the city almost every day of the year. That said, things to tend to calm down a bit in the “winter”, a term I use loosely coming from Chicago. Winter in Sydney is more of what I’d call a moderate autumn, but it still gets a bit chilly and tends to push people indoors. As a result, the beach and park festivals aren’t as prevalent, so the city puts on other events instead.

Sydney Skyline during Vivid Sydney

One of the most visually interesting events during this time was Vivid Sydney, a festival of “Light, Music & Ideas”. There were many displays all over the city but, as usual, the best ones out there were found in and around Sydney Harbour, the home of Sydney’s most famous landmarks. Hotels, office buildings, museums and other landmarks all came to life as giant projector screens, with animated light shows bringing new life to the facades. The Customs House, for example, filled up with water, flexed in and out, and broke to pieces before turning into a giant microprocessor (courtesy of Intel, the sponsor). Even the Circular Quay train station got in on the action!

Sydney Opera House during Vivid Sydney

As usual, the centerpiece of the display was the Opera House, which hosted a variety of different light shows. Some were more fanciful, showing sea creatures swimming around. The best displays, though, were the ones that highlighted the building’s structure itself. Light turned the famous sails into fans, glass mosaics and geodesic curves. I took plenty of pictures; prints are available if you’re interested! Look for an upcoming picture post to check out more shots.

A night out with Nicholas, Tarrah, Kristen and Tessa

A few weeks later, we welcomed our first official guests (a few friends had come through as part of separate trips). Tessa and Tarrah visited for a couple weeks and traveled to Brisbane and Cairns before returning to Sydney to tour the city and surrounding areas. While here, they held koalas, went snorkeling on the Great Barrier Reef, and got to meet some of Kristen’s friends. They and Kristen also climbed the Sydney Harbour Bridge, an extremely touristy and fun experience that we recommend to all incoming visitors. As is frequently the case, the two weeks flew by, but it was great to see familiar faces and share part of our life in Australia.

 

Tessa, Tarrah and Kristen climbing the Sydney Harbour Bridge